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ONTARIO GRAIN FARMER

11

JANUARY 2018

of these events is not nearly as frequently

significant as you might be lead to believe

by reading the news.

Instead, be aware of the position your local

buyers are in. Get creative about your selling

arrangements and capture the opportunity

that’s out there if you’re willing to look a

little closer to home.

Jeff Robinson is a grain merchandiser for

Woodrill Farms Ltd.

ä

Easy as it is to get in the habit of not planting small grains

when nobody’s offering an incentive, now that the incentive is

there, you should evaluate your selling options wisely.

then, we would have to feed that surplus one

mouth at a time basically. But Ontario’s export

capabilities have ballooned now, and we’re

not exactly doomed to the same fate.

The problem is, our ports are only open

until December and they won’t open again

until the spring. I wouldn’t be optimistic

about corn prices until we see the ports

open again. It’s going to take clear through

until March for us to deal with that surplus.

With the way things were in late fall, May

is when I’d start to be optimistic about

corn again.

Practice patience with your marketing plans

this year. When we make our marketing plans,

we should only use the information that seems

like it is reasonable at the time. We don’t want

to start making marketing plans with 80 year

droughts in mind, or disastrous flooding, or

even political factors like a potential breakdown

in NAFTA negotiations. These things happen

once in a generation. History tells the impact